Interstate Custom Combining in the Great Plains in 1971 William F LaGrone

ISBN: 9780428184643

Published: January 11th 2018

42 pages


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Interstate Custom Combining in the Great Plains in 1971  by  William F LaGrone

Interstate Custom Combining in the Great Plains in 1971 by William F LaGrone
January 11th 2018 | | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 42 pages | ISBN: 9780428184643 | 9.80 Mb

Excerpt from Interstate Custom Combining in the Great Plains in 1971Interstate custom crews came from as far away as California and Florida to harvest in the Great Plains. But, in terms of number of crews, number of combines, and acres harvested,... MoreExcerpt from Interstate Custom Combining in the Great Plains in 1971Interstate custom crews came from as far away as California and Florida to harvest in the Great Plains. But, in terms of number of crews, number of combines, and acres harvested, operators residing in Kansas and Oklahoma accounted for about 60 percent of the total.

Crews from these two States and Texas and North Dakota harvested more than a million acres each.Operators harvested more acreage in their own State than in any other State, except for operators residing in Oklahoma, Wyoming, and other States. Oklahoma Operators harvested more grain in Kansas than in Oklahoma. Since Kansas had the greatest wheat acreage, it attracted custom operators from all Plains States. About 88 percent of all interstate combines harvested crops in Kansas.About 91 percent of the operators reported they were also farmer-ranchers.

About half earned 50 percent or more of their gross income from custom combining.Custom combining is a longstanding profession - 65 percent of the operators had 10 or more years of experience. Only 6 percent reported combining for less than 2 years.Interstate combining is a way of lengthening the season to get maximum use of the highly specialized and expensive equipment.

The harvesting season lasts 10 to 20 days in any one location, but custom combiners were able to extend it to an average of 114 days by moving across State lines. Some crews harvested crops nearly year-round, but the majority started about June 1 and terminated combining before November 1.The us.

Interstate crews employed workers operating combines in 1971. There were two workers per combine - one operator and one truck driver to haul grain. The number of combines per crew ranged from 1 to 12. Two-combine crews were the most common- accounting for 43 percent of all crews and 38 percent of all acreage cut by interstate combiners.Interstate operators kept combines an average of 4 years. Those harvesting less than acres were kept an average of years, while machines cutting over acres were traded at years.

Over 84 percent of the operators reported full ownership of their combines, 8 percent reported a partnership, and 7 percent reported arrangements involving two or more operators.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy.

In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.



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